Buddy Scalera’s 2013 Conference and Speaking Recap

This was a busy year for me in terms of presentations and appearances. Content marketing has become a hot topic, so these days I’m out there talking about some of the how-to elements of getting started.

A few people have mentioned that I need to keep track of these speaking appearances better, so I created this post to document 2013.

 

Buddy Scalera explains content strategy using Grok comics drawn by Pat Quinn.  ICC2013 - San Francisco

Buddy Scalera explains content strategy using Grok comics drawn by Pat Quinn. ICC2013 – San Francisco

FEBRUARY:
February 7-8, 2013
The year kicked off with the Intelligent Content Conference 2013 in San Francisco. This event is one of the most technically advanced events, so the speakers are encouraged to talk about the how-to aspects of creating intelligent content. One of the organizers is Ann Rockley, who is an industry thought leader on XML-driven content. The other organizer is Scott Abel, the Content Wrangler, who is deeply involved with the technical details behind content management across multiple channels.

Anyway, I spoke at the ICC 2013 and delivered a presentation called “Channel-Agnostic Content Strategy for Happy Marketers.” It’s a deep dive into how content needs to be developed and managed to flow across multiple platforms. We had slightly tighter time slots, so the idea was to get into your story fast. It was a good approach that stripped out the fluff and forced you to get into the specifics of content formatting.

This is the deck I presented:

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Interview with PR News for My Next Content Strategy Presentation

Steve Goldstein of PR News.

Steve Goldstein of PR News.

Every once in a while, you gotta turn things upside down, right? Right. Let’s do it.

Next week, I’ll be speaking at the PR News Content Marketing Bookcamp. They posted a description of my panel and even ran a nice interview with me. I’m pretty excited to be meeting Ben Shields of ESPN, since we’ll be sharing a stage together for our panel. Good stuff.

But…I wanted to do something a little different. This time, I turn the tables and interview the convention organizer. In the hot seat is Steve Goldstein, who is the editorial director, events, for PR News. Let’s see what he has to say about the upcoming event…

 

BUDDY SCALERA: First off, hello. We’ve never actually met in person, but I am going to be speaking at one of your upcoming conferences. Can you tell me a little about the upcoming event?

STEVE GOLDSTEIN: What we’re doing is gathering thought leaders in content marketing from brands and from PR agencies to show PR professionals how they can help their brands and clients amp up their content strategy and, not incidentally, create content that’s shareable. Continue reading

Cross Channel Book Marketing

Creating Comics book by Buddy Scalera

My new book Creating Comics from Start to Finish is just beginning to hit stores now. And despite the fact that I do this marketing thing every day for my clients, I’ve found it to be challenging to apply the same principals at home for my own projects. Crazy, right?

There’s an old saying, “the shoemaker’s children go barefoot.” That pretty much means the stuff you do at work is not the stuff you want to do when you get home. But a book being published is a timely event, and that time will soon pass, so I need to take the opportunity to market my book while I still can.

Initially, I was spending most of my efforts on my Facebook Fan Page, which had around 700+ followers and is now over 800. This group has been supporting my photo reference books, so they were most receptive of the new book. A good start.

Then I did a little bit of content seeding. I created a video flip through of my book, which I placed on the Facebook Fan Page, YouTube, Flickr, and even Amazon. I’m monitoring all of the channels through Google Analytics to see which drives the most qualified traffic.
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Free…Me

A true Brand-You story.

Back when I’d graduated college, the job market was pretty tight. Not as tight as now, but jobs were scarce for communications majors.

I was working as an editor and writer, but I really wanted to get a job in public relations. Unfortunately, I had nothing on resume that showed PR experience, so I wasn’t getting called for interviews.

A friend told about a PR event she ran for a hospital. It sounded good, so I asked if I could borrow the idea.

I visited my local town rec center and offered to plan a “Summer Cycle Safety” event for kids in town. Something to teach the kiddies the rules of the road and encourage them to wear helmets ‘n’ stuff. I wasn’t looking for any money; just a volunteer project for experience.

They liked the idea (and my fee), and agreed to let me organize the event. Got a local bike shop to donate a helmet. Found a local sports-medicine physician to talk about bike injuries. Involved the police department, who brought safety literature. Some refreshments, a few signs, and we had an event.

With the Summer Cycle Safety event, I wrote a press release, which ran in the town paper. And I braced myself for the hundreds of people who would come streaming to the event. (Actually 25 people showed up, but who’s counting?)

Fortunately one reporter/photographer showed up, took a few shots, and we got a small article and photo in the town paper. But that was all I needed. I finally had something for my resume!

The very next PR job I applied for included my freshly updated portfolio. They called me. And I got the job.

I gave a little of me — for free — and it paid off.