Three Steps to a Better Presentation & Story

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Precondition your audience at the start of your presentation.

If you’re delivering a business pitch, you are trying to share an idea that the client will want to buy. That means it needs to be memorable. As a presenter, you need to make sure that your future client knows what the heck you are trying to say.

Don’t just tell them that you’re good at delivering a powerful message. Prove it in your presentation.

Here’s a good piece of advice for making presentations memorable, which I learned from my friend and co-worker, John Spingler (aka Sping).

Here are three basic steps to delivering a memorable pitch and marketing story:

  1. Tell them what you are going to tell them.
  2. Tell them.
  3. Tell them what you just told them.

Sounds really simple, right?

But if you’ve ever suffered through a dull PowerPoint presentation and wondered “where is this going?” then you know that delivering a clear message isn’t so simple. When a presentation lacks focus, it’s hard for your listener to remain focused. Continue reading

Kid Gives Good PowerPoint

If you work in corporate America, particularly in marketing, you probably build decks and presentations. For the most part, these presentations are built in PowerPoint. And suck.

Seriously, I sit through countless presentations, and the vast majority aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. (A little joke there. Hah.)

Well, apparently Scott McCloud knows how to make a really good presentation. And if you watch the embedded video (go full screen), you’ll see his 13-year old daughter Sky McCloud does too.

Sky McCloud Presentation from Duarte Design on Vimeo.

Ask yourself: Is your client presentation or pitch deck as good as the one delivered by this 13-year old?

McCloud Talks Tech on TED

Scott McCloud is a comic book creator who wrote a brilliant book called “Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art,” which is an amazing read, even if you don’t like comics. He masterfully breaks down the medium so that it becomes clear why comics connect with the brain to communicate stories.

A few years back, McCloud gave a talk at TED (Technology Entertainment Design), which is an annual conference in California. Not only is McCloud a smart guy who knows a lot about comics, technology, and science…he’s a terrific presenter.

Check out this video as he discusses how comic books and computers are evolving to leverage new technology. Good stuff. It’s especially compelling considering the implosion of traditional print publishing.