Interview with Health 2.0 Matchpoint for My Healthcare Speaking Event

Next week, I’m honored to be moderating a panel at Health 2.0 Matchpoint | East. As with my last conference, I thought it would be interesting to interview one of the convention planners.

Actually, they interviewed me first, and that Q&A is on the Health 2.0 website: Buddy Scalera of Ogilvy CommonHealth on Consumer Engagement

This next interview is quite interesting, at least from my perspective. Usually I am working closely with professional marketers and technology innovators in pharmaceutical marketing.

This particular interview is with Joy Bhosai, who comes to health technology from the healthcare side. Joy graduated Yale University with a degree of Master of Public Health (MPH). If that’s not enough, she went on to get her MD from UCSF. Not too shabby.

Joy is one of the people trying to drive innovation and new thinking in healthcare. Let’s hear what she has to say about health technology, healthcare innovations, and thought leadership.

 

BUDDY SCALERA: First, tell me who you are and what role you play at Health 2.0.

Joy Bhosai, Matchpoint Director for Healthcare 2.0.

Joy Bhosai, Matchpoint Director for Healthcare 2.0.

JOY BHOSAI: Joy Bhosai and I’m Health 2.0’s Matchpoint Director. Matchpoint is a program where we work with industry leaders to identify and select innovator companies to meet with. The Matchpoint program was established to help our sponsors separate signal from noise when evaluating health tech startups. We can identify companies with a lot of promise for partnerships, since we work to understand how emerging technologies meet the needs of our sponsors– who range from health providers such as Kaiser to payors like UnitedHealth.

 

Okay, so we’re going to be meeting at this Matchpoint | East event. This is new to me. Can you explain what people will be doing there?

Matchpoint | East consists of both meetings and workshops. Health tech companies go through an application process for which our team and our sponsors select participants to attend. Traditionally, over 500+ apply and 10-15 companies get select to meet with their sponsoring host. Each company selected is given 15 minutes to meet with their respective host sponsor. These lead to high yield, effective meetings for both parties.  In between the meetings, we also have workshops that are led by leading health tech experts for everyone to attend. Continue reading

Building Our $35 Raspberry Pi Computer

Raspberry Pi computer being assembled.

Raspberry Pi computer being assembled.

The quest continues…

A week ago, we purchased our Raspberry Pi computer, a $35 computer targeted at kids. We bought it for my daughter, who’d expressed interest in making her own video games.

The official Raspberry Pi store was sold out of these affordable little computers. I hunted around and found sellers on eBay offering them for $47. My daughter was excited to spend $35 of her own money to buy her own computer. I bit the bullet and paid the extra $12 to get the Pi.

Then the fun begins. It comes in a package with no cords, hard drive, or instructions. You get the manual as a PDF at the Raspberry Pi website.  Easy enough.

If you’re like me, you also discover that you don’t have all the cables you need. So instead of plugging it in and booting up, I had to order some cables and adapters. It wasn’t very expensive, but it did sort of strip away the mystique of a $35 computer. No biggie, I had most of the things I needed, including a cellphone charger (for the power source) and an SD card (for the hard drive). Continue reading

Dad’s Tech Quest – Introduction

TechQuest LogoWhen my kids were born, I decided that they would have access to technology. Real tech, not just games.

So before they could speak, their hands were slapping and clacking on the keyboard. This isn’t so unusual these days, as many modern American families have access to similar technology.

But I wanted to go one step further.

I believe my career in technology is due primarily to my early exposure to computers. My high school exposed us early in the 1980s to simple programming using the Commodore 64, a machine that was a gateway for thousands of tech-curious minds.

Then, in a move that would prove formative, my father bought me a used Apple IIc computer. It was a basic machine, but it was mine. I could tinker and explore at home, rather than in a computer lab. I used it primarily as a word processor, but it gave me the confidence to use technology as a tool.

And, like many before me, I was completely and utterly blown away the first time I saw my first classic Macintosh computer. Unlike many of my fellow students who walked past, I couldn’t wait to put my hands on it. Continue reading

Content Strategy and eBooks

Marvel Comics on iPad

The easiest thing to do is wait. When a new technology seems to be bubbling up at the edges of conversation, most people just wait. Wait to see how it turns out. See if it takes off.

When it comes to ebooks, the wait is over. Done. The handwriting is no longer on the wall; it’s being downloaded to your iPad.

Old Models, Redefined
The book business is faring much better than the music industry did when digital changed their business model. As millions of songs were being downloaded in the 90s, music companies were busy protecting their old-media distribution channels. At one time, music stores dotted strip malls and city street. Now, most are gone. Apple redefined their distribution model.

The next to be hit was the video business. Torrents made pirating easy. And since people already had home-entertainment centers, the devices of consumption were already in place. The studios were also slow to move, sticking with DVDs for too long. NetFlix was already busy redefining their distribution model. Continue reading

How Apps Are Ruining the World

Tesla: Master of Lightning. That would look cool on a business card.

Between our iPad, iPhone, and three iPod Touches, my family has over 100 installed apps. Amazing utilities, clever social apps, and plain old silly stuff.

I love my apps, but they are ruining the world. Sad, really.

Here’s the thing. Programming something for iOS isn’t exactly easy. There are some tools that cut your time, but if you want to maximize your app, you’ll have to put in the time or pay someone to do it. Someone smart and patient.

I’m all for creative entrepreneurs generating a profit from their hard work. I’ve certainly done it myself, so I wouldn’t begrudge someone else the opportunity to earn money. Unfortunately….

Unfortunately, some of the smartest people in the room aren’t solving problems anymore. They’re not figuring out the kinds of things that need figuring. They’re not inventing or improving inventions. They’re not even experimenting.

Nope, they’re coding apps that they’ll sell for 99 cents. And if they’re lucky (because luck is part of success), they’ll make some money. If not, they’ll just make another app. That’s where the gold seems to be. Continue reading

Nokia N8 – Two Week Photography Review

Nokia N8 includes a 12 megapixel camera and Ziess lens

For a phone, the Nokia N8 offers an incredibly powerful camera and video package in a smartphone about the same size as an Apple iPhone. And for two weeks, I shot several hundred photos and dozens of videos on the smartphone’s 16 Gb of internal memory.

But let me jump back for a moment. About a month ago, a person named Chris reached out to me from WOMWorld.com and offered me the opportunity to try out the Nokia N8. The Nokia N8 boasts a 12 megapixel camera with a Carl Zeiss lens, so I jumped at the chance to do a test and review.
Continue reading

UX, UI, Web Design and a Toaster Oven

Toaster oven

If you look around, you’ll find web design inspiration everywhere. Last week, I was inspired by the toaster oven, but not in a good way.

Imagine you’re hired to develop a website for a client. The first thing you must determine is the goal of the website, which will drive the key performance indicators (KPIs). Typically, we’ll want to develop the website to drive to most qualified users to the appropriate KPIs.

Don’t worry, I am getting to the toaster oven soon. I know you can’t wait.

Before the site is launched, it must be designed. Often designers will perform some level of usability testing, which may include internal and external user testing. This is done to ensure that the target user (who may or may not have good web skills) can actually find the KPIs. If people can’t find what you’re selling, then you’re probably not going to sell a lot of stuff.

Now, back to the toaster oven, which we purchased based largely on the reputation of the brand. Remember, “reputation” is often due to good marketing.
Continue reading

M2M – The Future of Appliance Connectivity

AT&T Embedded Systems Are Coming

Right now, as of today, things like Internet-enabled refrigerators seem a little silly. Same thing for a ‘Net-connected dryer. Or any other machine that we typically thing of as, well, analog.

But in the periphery of the technology world are people who are developing machine to machine (M2M) hardware and applications. AT&T is one of the companies hoping to be the wireless connection between these devices. So, yeah, your lawnmower and your WiFi card will be tied together.

Looking forward, one day we may look back and wonder how we did without these interconnected M2M-based hardware appliances. It’s sort of the way we are all now deeply connected with our smartphones. (Seriously, if you left the house right now without your phone, you’d be feeling pretty anxious.)

At one time (deep in our past), we used to leave the house without our own personal phone universe. Look back in very, very, very old picture books and magazines, and you will see evidence of public telephones. People put dimes into these phones to use them for a few minutes. The “network” was something completely different back then.

In the near future and in the present, there are pill bottles that are Internet connected. There are Net connections in cars that allow you to Twitter while you drive. Read the CullmannDesign Blog for other ways that embedded systems are integrating into our lives.

As a technology marketer, I immediately dream about the ways that I can share brand messages on these new channels. It’s all about the content message. The channel is just a way of getting in front of people in unique and relevant ways. M2M will be another way that people get information that matters to them. Good marketers will figure out ways to send the right message to the right person, hopefully at the right time.

Last year, we saw the first skirmishes in the battle for the sofa. Now the M2M technology wars are just starting to get interesting and my garage-door opener has a Facebook page. How ya “like” that?

May the best Internet-connected blender win!

More stuff to read:

NetFlix Ideas – Improving a Streaming Experience

NetFlix LogoYou have to be impressed with NetFlix. Seriously. It’s a terrific service, particularly the instant streaming on the Roku XDS. Excellent picture quality, crisp sound, and a solid catalogue of ever-changing content. At CES, several companies announced that they would include a dedicated NetFlix button on their remote controls. This is a company that is getting it right.

That said, here are a few of the features I would like to see NetFlix introduce:

More flexible parental controls. Right now, NetFlix has some basic parental control settings. You can set it so that videos under a certain rating — like PG — are unavailable to your NetFlix enabled devices. But that’s sort of a problem, since it blocks both you and your kids. So after the kids go to bed, forget streaming Rated PG-13 and R movies through your Roku. It’s locked. Even the Wii has a setting where you can block certain games. Allow parents to set profiles so that you can limit access based on user profiles.

Better control of the Instant Queue. This ties back to the parental controls. If you watch a regular R-rated movie, your kids can just click the “resume” button and pick up where you left off. And even if they don’t, they may think that a movie like “The Human Centipede” is a nature flick from the Discovery Channel. (It’s not.) It would be nice to be able to block kids from even seeing certain movie boxes, while allowing you to surf what you want with a pass code.

Spoiler alerts. It’s interesting to skim reviews when deciding if you want to add something to your Instant Queue. Too many people include critical spoilers in their write ups. It would be nice to give the authors (and the community) a little button that notes that the review includes spoilers. Heck, maybe you can even allow people to highlight the spoiler section, so that it just comes up with the section blocked out. That would allow reviewers to self-censor sections without deleting their entire reviews. And then, after the movie, you could decide if you wanted to go back and read those sections. There are actually some interesting discussions in there that you can read after you’ve seen the movie.

Social sharing. It’s really surprising that they haven’t incorporated any social features into the NetFlix site. I mean, most people want to know what their friends think of a particular movie. If our taste matches their tastes, we may be more likely to trust their movie recommendations. Even the Apple iTunes store has a service like Apple’s Ping. I want to find my friends and share reviews and recommendations with them. They already have a sizable following on Facebook and on Twitter.

Marketing Perspecitive

Not only are these features well within reach of NetFlix, they would derive clear benefits from exploring them. Now, I put on my marketer’s hat and offer a few suggestions.

First off, they already crowdsourced their recommendations engine. This famous NetFlix contest raised awareness…and created a fantastic resource for their service. People suddenly became interested in NetFlix and for good reason. NetFlix showed that they cared about their core service and did something creative to improve it. They could steal a page from their own book and crowd source the development of certain features. If done properly, they could continue to innovate, provide improved service, and incentivize and reward innovation.

Second, they could add parent-friendly features and earn crucial support from DVD-exhausted parents. Ever try to organize a massive collection of Disney and Pixar DVDs only to discover that some of them are either lost or scratched? Heck, you’d have me sold just by telling me that the movies start instantly. And that my kids won’t get bombarded by trailers and commercials. Rolling out parent-friendly features — and promoting it aggressively where parents go for information — would get people to explore the affordable streaming-only option. If you have the right content (and at this point they do), parents would be comfortable about streaming content into their homes.

Third, they could mobilize their existing fan base using social media. Allow people to interact with their peers, form groups, and personalize their NetFlix experience. It doesn’t have to be as complicated as the Facebook privacy settings, but a little bit of customization and socialization would be welcome to some folks. Plus, they could give existing NetFlix fans ways of sharing their enthusiasm with people who don’t subscribe. Yet.

NetFlix is an important service that is helping to pave the way to a world media is paid for by consumers and, back catalogues are still valuable, and distribution isn’t limited to retail stores. Between services like NetFlix, Hulu, Apple TV, Roku, Boxee and others, the streaming world is just starting to get truly interesting.

More to explore:

Roku XDS Week 1

Roku LogoWe’re a week into it with the Roku XDS. Let’s take a moment and review a few of my initial impressions of bringing Internet video into my living room.

NetFlix experience is quite good, but I find myself playing with my Instant Queue almost as much as I watch actual movies. The NetFlix recommendation engine is amazing, and it exposed me to several movies and documentaries that were right on target. Streaming NetFlix through the Roku is a pleasure.

Hulu Plus is definitely attractive, since I am a big fan of well-produced television shows. Something about a serialized story appeals to me in both comics and TV. However, adding another $7.99 monthly subscription on top of the NetFlix sub is going to get expensive fast.  At this point, NetFlix seems to have an adequate collection of TV shows, so I’ll stick with that for a while.

Adding custom channels is pretty easy, so I have updated the Roku XDS with Blip.tv and Revision3. Here the experience is rather uneven. The connection and content are fine, but some of the programming is barely a step above cable access. It’s too bad because I like the idea of watching long-tail TV shows.

That said, I am happy to watch iFanboy on Revision3 much more than I do on my laptop. Big improvement.

NetFlix LogoIt’s worth noting that this whole Roku and NetFlix upgrade traces back to the local movie theater raising prices last year. The ticket price of a first-run movie increased one week from $9 to $11. Just to be clear, I typically went to the movies on a Tuesday and the price increase was on regular 2D films. I can understand the price increase on 3D movies because there are special projectors, glasses, and good stuff like that.

It’s not like I couldn’t afford the $2, but it was kind of annoying that they skipped over $10 and went right to $11. Product pricing and perceived value is certainly a psychological game in every industry. In this case, the price jump bummed me out, and I was in the habit of seeing a new movie just about every week.

But I still need my movie fix…and good luck trying to find a local video rental store. Okay, we have a RedBox near us, but for whatever reason, I just never remember that when I am in movie mode.

So NetFlix on the Roku has filled the void left by regular movie theaters. It’s not quite the same, but the combined depth and variety of their library of movies, TV shows, and other content is truly impressive.

I’m looking forward to exploring more channels on the Roku, just to see what’s available. There are a few premium paid channels, and if the content is good and the price is right, I may give them a try.

Well, one week in and I am pretty happy with the Roku. I haven’t really explored it fully, nor have I tried plugging anything into the USB slot. Check back again for more Roku, NetFlix and other streaming reports.

More good readin’: