Historic Gas Prices – 1992 – 2008 – Log at Pump

Back when I was a kid, my father used to keep a log of his gasoline expenses. He would meticulously record the cost of the gas, how many gallons he put into the car, and the total amount he spent.

He maintained several different notebooks, most of which were lost over time. He found two or three of these tiny notebook from 1992 – 2008. He took the time to transfer them to Excel. And here is this data, through the magic of the web, now available to you.

My dad’s historic gasoline logs from 1992 – 2008.
Here it is as an Excel-compatible document on Google Docs.
http://goo.gl/gpI0i

Now you know that my dad paid $1.02 for a gallon of gas on 8/31/1992. And then $1.01 per gallon on 5/3/1993. Adjusted for inflation, I wonder what that price would be today. Do you know how to figure that out? If so, please share.

UPDATE: Since originally posting the blog post, several people have mentioned that they or family members have logged gas prices, mostly for the purpose of calculating gas mileage. Many cars now include this basic average calculation right on the dashboard next to the gas gauge, but I bet there are people who still keep a log of their gas data. Hopefully more people share this stuff.

Gas prices are notoriously unstable and typically only go up, especially in the summer months. You can use this data for graphing, charting, or making some sort of infographic. If you consider economic factors that relate to the Middle East, including the transportation of foreign oil, are we paying more or less for gas at the pump? Is plastic (made from petroleum) more or less expensive?

This data is editable in Google Docs, so you can actually insert a worksheet with comments. Or you can download it as Excel.

 

Creative Commons Fair Use

Also, you can do whatever you want with this data. It is protected under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0). In plain language, that means you can use it for commercial and non commercial purposes, as long as you credit it back here to me. That’s all.

Use the following: (c) 2010 Buddy Scalera – http://www.wordspicturesweb.com.

 

Creative Commons License
Gasoline Prices History Scalera 1992-2008 by Buddy Scalera is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at wordspicturesweb.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://wordspicturesweb.com/?p=1820.

 


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  • Amy Jeynes

    Cool! http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm indicates that $1.01 in 1992 had the same buying power as $1.58 in 2010. –Prof

  • So what’s that mean? Does that mean that our $4.00 a gallon gasoline is rising faster than our cost of living?

  • M

    I have very strong memories of paying only 63 cents per gallon around 1998/1999.  I filled up at Walmart with a prepaid card which reduced the 66 cents per gallon price by 3 cents.  I am certain of the time period because it was within the first year of moving to my first home.  I did that in April/May of 1998.   I remember thinking how crazy it was that I was paying so little for gas and that those prices had been under a dollar for quite a while.

  • Yeah, back in those days, you wouldn’t even think twice about filling up your gas tank and just driving around. I had an old Chevy Impala with a huge tank, and I remember paying under a buck for gas. I could never afford to drive that car today, especially at $3.99 a gallon.

  • McLauchlin

    Bud,

    It’s easy (and fun!) to adjust for inflation. I’ve used this many, many times: http://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm

    Jim McLauchlin

  • McLauchlin

    These days, Economic Price Index and inflation is rising from 1-3% annually. Been that way from about 2005-present.

    That’s why your savings account is yielding less than 1% annually. Yet, the old usury rate of 24.75% on credit cards is gone, and some rates are as high as 29%. Funny, that.

    Or, as my dad used to say: “The rich get richer and the poor get kids.”

    Jim McLauchlin

  • Yeah, sort of a bummer, if you think about it. Fortunately, I don’t give it any thought. Except, I do like you’re dad’s saying. Kids are crazy expensive!

    Buddy