Dear Apple, Market to Me

Apple iPad

Apple iPad

It sort of defies logic. Consumer buying, that is. There’s a logic, and then there’s consumer buying logic.

Take Apple, for example. Steve Jobs wanted to make “insanely great” products. It became a battle cry for the whole company, and as consumers, we bought it. They made the iPod and iMac, and we bought them. These were insanely great products that we had to have. Soon there will be an assault of iPad competitors that make similar touch-screen tablets. And yet, people will still buy the Apple iPad for some logical…and many illogical reasons.

Before Apple released these products, there were other computer devices that did similar things for less money. After Apple released these products, there were even more choices for even less money. And yet we keep buying the Apple brand.

Why is that? Well, we’ve been marketed to…and we like it. Apple somehow takes buyer’s remorse and turns it into buyer evangelism. People who buy Apple get excited with their purchase and tell their family and friends. It is classic viral marketing. It’s better than viral marketing, it’s passion marketing. Social marketing and passion marketing.

It’s the kind of marketing that makes us buy expensive cars with bigger engines than we can possibly use. The amount of horsepower that you can purchase far exceeds you ability to use it on any regular basis. But we don’t mind. Driving can be about getting from point A to point B. Or it can be about passion, excitement, and sex appeal. It becomes a gap between what you need and what you want.

Want and need are two different things. I need a new computer for my home-based work. Could I get an inexpensive machine that does the basics? Of course. But instead, I will go beyond basic need and deep into the want territory.

I’m buying a new Mac. I like how it works. I get great service from Macs, so I am willing to pay the extra few bucks to have the Mac experience. I’m sure the PC would run similar software, allowing me to get my job done. But I like the Mac.

Logic gives way to passion, and I am voluntarily buying a product that may be slightly better in performance, but much better in consumer experience.

Is the Mac insanely great? You bet. But so are other competitive products that cost less. For $200-$500 less, I can get a similarly equipped PC. Am I actually paying for a better product or a better marketing experience? Let me help you decide….

My new Mac arrives next week.

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